What is an Accountability Partner, Why You Need One & How to Find One

 
What is an accountability partner why you need one and how to find one - stacy kessler.001 copy.jpeg
 

What is an accountability partner?

Do you ever struggle with being disciplined enough to accomplish the things you want to do in your business?

I do!

This was especially a major challenge for me when I was a newer entrepreneur. I’m the epitome of a procrastinator and deliver well mostly under deadlines and high pressure. When I left the corporate world, I no longer had a boss with expectations of how I should be spending my time and what I should be accomplishing.

Even though I had big entrepreneurial dreams, I found it really tough to be proactive about the things I wanted to do in my business, set my own deadlines and goals, and stick to them.

Then I learned the power of an accountability partner and it was a Game. Changer.

An accountability partner is someone you meet with regularly that holds you accountable to doing the things you need to do in order to accomplish the things you want to accomplish.

It’s someone that knows you and your business (or that you want to build a relationship with) and that you’re willing to give permission to to call you on your BS, challenge you, ask you tough questions, make observations, and of course, hold you accountable.

Goal accountability

If you’re like me and have big goals but struggle to make progress towards them on your own, then you’ll find a ton of value in having an accountability partner in goal achievement.

I suggest meeting with a business accountability partner weekly. This is the perfect frequency to spend an hour talking about what you’ve both accomplished in the last week and what you plan to do the following week.

When you talk about these things with an accountability partner each week a couple of things happen:

  1. You take the time to reflect on your accomplishments, realize how much you can actually get done in a week, and have more motivation to keep you moving forward.

  2. You take the time to plan for the following week (so you know what you’re going to tell your accountability partner). This means you’ll be more intentional with your time instead of it just ticking away without accomplishing the important work that will push you towards your goals.

  3. Your accountability partner has a more objective perspective and can challenge you on what or how much you have planned. This is especially helpful if you’re someone who thinks you can accomplish an unrealistic amount (setting yourself up for disappointment and feeling an unnecessary level of stress).

  4. Your accountability partner can help you recognize, and overcome, your blinds spots, destructive patterns, or opportunity areas.

  5. As you go through the week, you’ll be more motivated to get your shit done so you don’t have to explain to your accountability partner why you didn’t do it.

  6. When you do fall short on accomplishing your goals you have someone to help you figure why and what you can do about it.

  7. When you’re stuck, you have someone that intimately knows you and your business to help you talk things out.

  8. When you’re having a bad week, you have someone to help you process and be your cheerleader to encourage you to move past it and keep going.

  9. When you’re having a great week, you have someone to celebrate with you.

These nine things are basically a recipe for goal-reaching success. In fact, I might be so bold as to say that besides actually having a goal-setting process and making time for it, having an accountability partner may be the #1 thing to help lead you to success in achieving your goals.

I believe a business accountability partner can really push you further in your businesses than you could go by yourself.

How to find an accountability partner

You can have both free and paid accountability partners. Here are some ways to find both:

Ways to find free accountability partners

  1. Conferences

  2. Events & meet-ups

  3. Entrepreneurial Facebook groups

  4. Coworking spaces

  5. Entrepreneurship/small business programs

  6. Networking/coffee chats to meet peers or mentors

Paid accountability partners & programs

  1. Business coach, strategist, or consultant (see which is right for you)

  2. A paid accountability program

  3. A paid entrepreneur membership site with daily/weekly check-ins

  4. Mastermind group

Accountability partner examples

You should experience major benefits from having just one accountability partner.

I personally have chosen to meet with multiple people regularly. I meet with two of them weekly and actually call them accountability partners. I don’t have a formal accountability relationship with the others but they all push me further in some way and fill different needs for me.

To give you some real-life examples of how to form these relationships, here are all of the accountability-type relationships I have in my life and how they came to be.

Examples of accountability partners

  1. Kelly Beischel - She was my first real accountability partner and has turned into a dear friend. Kelly’s a powerful coach that knows me better than most people. We’ve been meeting weekly on and off for years since she became a member at my old coworking space. How we approach our time together has evolved with us and our needs. We are similar in our values, struggles, and the way we approach business so we relate well to each other and what we’re going through. We also read The One Thing together and use these principles with each other. She’s not afraid to challenge me and ask me the tough questions and I do the same for her. We often times pray for each other and our businesses. We’ve had some of our greatest business breakthroughs in our weekly chats and she’s seen me through it all. Right now we meet via phone Friday mornings since we no longer cowork together, but we occasionally meet up in person since we live in the same city. Chatting on Friday allows us to make sure we end our week with a bang and have the following week planned out before we take a break for the weekend. We talk specifics like what day we are going to do what and sometimes follow-up via text during the week if we need to.

  2. Aga Westfal - She’s my newest partner in crime and we meet weekly via Zoom since she lives in Hawaii. Aga is a brand and content expert and we often turn to each other for specific feedback and advice around how we are approaching our business and our client work. Aga is such a thoughtful listener and makes sure I don’t breeze past things that should be given more thought. We’ve also decided to reflect quarterly on our specific goals. We have the same baseline understanding of how we approach goal setting because we met in a virtual goal setting course with Pia Silva. We talk on Mondays and lay out our top few priorities for the week with each other.

  3. My husband, Dan - Running my first business I pretty much kept him out of things. I am blessed to have such a supportive husband who really believes in me. That being said, he was often in the dark about what I was working on and what kind of contribution to our family finances he could expect from my business. I realized that giving him better visibility would actually push me to be a better business manager especially when it came to the numbers. So, when I started my second business and set way bigger goals that I ever have before, we decided that I was going to give him a brief state of the business most Mondays and make sure he always knew my business numbers. Whenever I’m grappling with a big financial investment for my business, he also always gets a say.

  4. Rebeca Arbona  - We recently connected when we met as guests at a networking group. We hated the group but definitely bonded over talking about our awkward experience. She’s a fiery go-getter when it comes to business and we appreciate each other’s direct and frank thoughts. Our first chat lasted hours as we connected over being women who have big-ass business goals and aren’t afraid to talk about them (including money goals). She’s a brand strategist and it was refreshing to talk shop with a fellow strategist (strategists like us have a unique way of thinking and working things out). We started off meeting monthly and now meet quarterly in person, working through our biggest business challenges each time. Because of how often we meet, we’ve decided to use the time to tackle strategic issues rather than discuss specific priorities but I imagine that over time as we get to know each other better how we push and challenge each other will evolve.

  5. Clancy Calkins - She’s a talented filmmaker who has done all my brand videos. I met Clancy through my business, Platform 53, and we decided to trade video work for coworking space + strategy consulting. We’ve been friends ever since we shared a bottle of wine and pondered the existence of aliens and the real meaning of life together. We meet monthly to catch up as friends and chat about our monthly business goals. We make sure our goals are moving us one step closer to achieving ultimate freedom and flexibility in our business so we can travel the world, something we are both super passionate about.

IN A NUTSHELL: Accountability partners (what, why, and how)

  1. An accountability partner is someone you meet with regularly that holds you accountable to doing the things you need to do in order to accomplish the things you want to accomplish.

  2. It’s someone that knows you and your business (or that you want to build a relationship with) and that you’re willing to give permission to to call you on your BS, challenge you, ask you tough questions, make observations, and of course, hold you accountable.

  3. I suggest meeting weekly with a business accountability partner This is the perfect frequency to spend an hour talking about what you’ve both accomplished in the last week and what you plan to do the following week.

  4. Doing this will help you crush your goals because you’ll be intentional about:

    1. Reflecting on your accomplishments

    2. Planning for each week

    3. Asking thoughtful questions about what you each have planned

    4. Discovering and overcoming your weaknesses

    5. Spending your week how you said you would

    6. Figuring out why you might be falling short of your goals

    7. Talking things out when you’re stuck

    8. Working through your low points

    9. Celebrating your high points

  5. Find a peer accountability partner through coworking spaces, meet-ups, and online groups or pay for an experienced accountability partner like a business coach, mastermind, or accountability specific program.

  6. You might choose to have multiple accountability partners that all serve different purposes.

Other ways to boost your business success

Besides having an accountability partner, there are five foundational strategies I believe are essential for all entrepreneurs and businesses to figure out in order to be set up for success. Download my free step-by-step checklist below to help you figure out yours.

PIN THIS

What is an accountability partner why you need one and how to find one - stacy kessler.001 copy 2.jpeg
 
 

 
stacy kessler - pathfinding strategist

Hey There!

I’m Stacy, an entrepreneur, strategist, and adventurer dedicated to helping entrepreneurs figure stuff out and build their dream businesses.

You are meant to do important and amazing things in this world and I’m here to help.

My Affiliate Promise

Occasionally you’ll see links to resources and products in my articles. Some of these are affiliate links, but I only recommend things I have personally used and highly recommend.

 

You might also be interested in these articles


You don’t want to miss this.

Sign up to get these strategy articles delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.